Photo Critique – Rainy Morning by John Rowe

Rainy Morning by John Rowe.

Rainy Morning by John Rowe.

I’ve selected the above photo, Rainy Morning by John Rowe, as the first photo to critique as part of my Flickr critique group. Thanks to all who have joined the group thus far! We have 24 group members now and I really enjoyed looking through the 35 images posted in the last month or so. It was a real challenge to select a photo. Several immediately jumped out at me as excellent photos, and in the end I selected John’s shot of cascades on the Cold River both because I like these kinds of shots and because I felt it would make a good image for the group to learn from. For having his image selected, John will receive a copy of a book of his choice from our website. Continue Reading

Thinking about texture.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

I’ve had a hard time getting motivated to post to this blog lately because I’m in the process of writing two books this winter, and it really is taking up every free minute of the day. However, with the recent snows here in New England, I’ve had a few chances to get out and shoot. One aspect of winter photography that seems to really resonate with photographers is the incredible textures found in fresh snow, wind blown snow, frozen snow, any kind of snow. I’ll be talking about this in detail in one of the books I’m writing (The AMC Guide to Digital Outdoor Photography,) but I thought I’d briefly discuss it here today. The texture of snow varies of course, but when photographed properly, the viewer feels like he or she can almost reach out and feel the individual snow crystals. When the snow is blown into ripples like in the above photo, the texture itself becomes an important compositional element. Continue Reading