Photo Critique – Fog in Yellowstone by Chris Lascell

Fog and Trees by Chris Lascell

Fog and Trees by Chris Lascell

This week, I’ve chosen to critique Chris Lascell’s photo of fog and trees. Chris shot this on a recent trip to Yellowstone National Park and says that “The photo was taken near Old Faithful. It’s an area of the park with lots of geothermal activity, so remains covered in fog until late in the morning. The fog lifted and almost immediately switched to bright mid-day sun.” Many of my favorite nature photos involve dramatic atmospheric conditions, and fog is something I seek out whenever I can in order to add a bit of mystery and mood to a photo. Being in the right place at the right time is half the battle in outdoor photography, and Chris did a great job of finding a scene with beautiful subject matter and light. Continue Reading

What to photograph during a winter with no snow.

Dawn over the Atlantic, Rye, NH.

Dawn over the Atlantic, Rye, NH.

If you live in the northern U.S., you are probably experiencing a low snow winter this year. In Portsmouth, New Hampshire where I live we haven’t had any appreciable snow since before Halloween! The gray and brown hues of a snowless landscape can definitely make it hard for a landscape photographer to be inspired enough to get out there and shoot. I feel fortunate that I chose his winter to start a new project I call 0630, where I go out every morning and make a picture at 6:30 (you can read more about the project in this post I made over at the Outdoor Photographer website.) The project has forced me to get out and shoot, when I normally would have stayed in bed, and it’s really getting my creative juices flowing and giving me good practice on techniques I don’t always use on a regular basis. For most of the last 6 weeks, I’ve been shooting primarily 30-45 minutes before sunrise, so here are some tips on what to do when it’s winter, it’s dark, and there’s no snow. Continue Reading

Winter Photo Tips

Fall Snow.
Fall Snow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I posted this on my other blog back in October, but given the season, it seems appropriate to post it again here. Winter is a great time to get out and make some photos – if you’re prepared for the cold and snow. Continue Reading

Thinking about texture.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

I’ve had a hard time getting motivated to post to this blog lately because I’m in the process of writing two books this winter, and it really is taking up every free minute of the day. However, with the recent snows here in New England, I’ve had a few chances to get out and shoot. One aspect of winter photography that seems to really resonate with photographers is the incredible textures found in fresh snow, wind blown snow, frozen snow, any kind of snow. I’ll be talking about this in detail in one of the books I’m writing (The AMC Guide to Digital Outdoor Photography,) but I thought I’d briefly discuss it here today. The texture of snow varies of course, but when photographed properly, the viewer feels like he or she can almost reach out and feel the individual snow crystals. When the snow is blown into ripples like in the above photo, the texture itself becomes an important compositional element. Continue Reading