Photo Critique – First Light On The Auto Road by Jeff Sinon.

First Light On The Auto Road by Jeff Sinon.

This week’s critique features this photo of dawn above New Hampshire’s Mount Washington by Jeff Sinon. The assignment was to try different focal lengths and perspectives and create an image with visual depth and/or compelling graphic design. Continue Reading

Right Place, Right Time.

Rain showers over Long Island Sound.

Rain showers over Long Island Sound.

A big part of nature photography is being in the right place at the right time. Sometimes this is luck, like in the above photo of a storm in Long Island Sound, but most consistently successful photographers make their own luck through attention to detail and hard work.  By putting yourself in beautiful places at the right time, you give yourself a much better chance of getting a unique photo when weather conditions and light are at their best. For several years, I’ve been using various software programs to chart sunrise/sunset and moonrise/moonset times and positions to help me determine where and when to be for the best light. I’m currently using an iPhone app called LightTrac and a PC program called the Photographer’s Ephemeris (which also comes in an iPhone version) to do this. Continue Reading

Thinking about texture.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

Patterns in the snow on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg, NH.

I’ve had a hard time getting motivated to post to this blog lately because I’m in the process of writing two books this winter, and it really is taking up every free minute of the day. However, with the recent snows here in New England, I’ve had a few chances to get out and shoot. One aspect of winter photography that seems to really resonate with photographers is the incredible textures found in fresh snow, wind blown snow, frozen snow, any kind of snow. I’ll be talking about this in detail in one of the books I’m writing (The AMC Guide to Digital Outdoor Photography,) but I thought I’d briefly discuss it here today. The texture of snow varies of course, but when photographed properly, the viewer feels like he or she can almost reach out and feel the individual snow crystals. When the snow is blown into ripples like in the above photo, the texture itself becomes an important compositional element. Continue Reading