Waterfall Photo Tips

I was in the White Mountains last week, and while here is still snow on a lot of the trails, the streams have warmed up, the water is flowing, and waterfalls are at full strength. I put together this video to share the techniques I use when making my waterfall photos. Let me know if you find it helpful.

On another note, I’m embarking on ambitious film project next week called The Power of Place. Please take a look at what I have planned, and if you like it, pledge to my Kickstarter campaign by May 16th to help make it possible. Thanks!

-Jerry

Week 10 – Series Wrap-Up.

Kennebunk, Maine. Kayaking the Mousam River.

Well, we’ve made it through ten weeks of outdoor photography tips together. I really appreciate all of you who have taken the time to watch this series, submit photos, and send me e-mails. I have had a lot of fun and even learned a few things myself! This week’s video encourages you to “participate in the landscape” to make better pictures, and hopefully it will give you another dose of inspiration to get you out there and have fun with your camera. Continue Reading

Week 9 – Filters.

A polarizer reduces glare on reflective surfaces, saturating colors and adding contrast.

Over the course of this video series, I’ve mentioned a few filters from time to time and promised to discuss them in more detail in a later video. Well, here it is! In the video, I talk about the three filters I regularly use (and they’re the only filters I use): Continue Reading

Week 8 – Shoot Sharp.

Use a tripod to eliminate unsharp photos due to camera movement.

In this week’s video I discuss how to create sharp images, whether you are hand holding your camera or using a tripod. This may not be the most exciting topic, but it is pretty darn important if you ever want to display your images as anything but a low-res Facebook photo or a 4″ x 6″ print. Continue Reading

Week 7 – Capturing Motion.

Use a fast shutter speed to stop action.

Last week I talked about varying your aperture to create different effects through depth of field. In a static landscape scene where nothing is moving, you can set your aperture, then use whatever shutter speed gives you a proper exposure (assuming you are using a tripod if your shutter speed is less than around 1/125 second.) However, when part of the scene is moving, your shutter speed becomes just as important as your aperture in determining the final look of your image. Do you stop the action, or let it blur? Continue Reading

Week 6 – Depth of Field.

A girl boogie boarding at Popham Beach State Park in Phippsburg, Maine.

This week we tackle depth of field, which describes how much of your photo appears to be in focus, from the front of the image to the distant background. Continue Reading

Week 5: Composition – Perspective, Depth, and Scale.

In this week’s video, I continue to talk about composition, specifically in regards to perspective, visual depth, and scale. Hopefully, you now have a handle on balance, dominance, and simplicity from the last couple of weeks because you still need to take all of those things into account when applying this week’s tip. Continue Reading

Week 4: Composition – Dominance and Simplicity

Last week I covered balance in a composition and how the rule of thirds can help you achieve a more dynamic look by creating an asymmetrical balance. This week’s video looks at dominance and simplicity, two concepts that will help you insure that the main subject of your photo takes center stage (though it should probably be a little off-center…) Whenever you take the time to get your camera out of your pack you are obviously struck by some aspect of the scene enough to want to take a picture. Continue Reading

Week 3: Composition Basics.

Now that you understand light and exposure (you did watch the tips from week 1 and week 2, right?) it’s time to tackle composition. Composition is the most creative part of photography and involves a myriad of concepts, from perspective and balance, to depth of field and scale. It’s also an aspect of photography that requires a lot of non-technical input like imagination and inspiration. That part is hard to teach because it comes from the heart, but there are some technical considerations in regards to composition that I’ll outline in the next few weeks. Continue Reading

Week 2 – Use Your Histogram

Modern cameras are pretty good at determining the proper camera settings for making properly exposed photos, but if you are going to consistently achieve well-exposed images you will eventually need to take your camera out of program mode and make your own decisions regarding exposure. Back in olden times (about ten years ago,) we shot film and couldn’t see our results until that film was developed. I know I regularly threw out a number of slides per roll due to poor exposure, despite using several techniques for determining proper exposure. With the advent of the histogram in digital cameras, there really is no need to improperly expose an image if you are paying attention. Continue Reading