To Blur or Not To Blur: Shooting Outdoor Adventures

Sometimes images do well in the market if they convey a sense of motion and action. As photographers we are storytellers and our images need to convey that story. If you are into photographing action subjects like skiing, mountain biking, running, water sports, or any moving subject, you can enhance an image and story by emphasizing that movement. There are essentially two ways to show motion: you move the camera with the subject or you move the subject while the camera is still.You might think that freezing a moving subject in place tells a better story and it will in some cases like a skier in the air or any subject better displayed as ‘frozen’ in place. Continue Reading

Color workflow – Image Editing and output

In the previous segments, we have discussed color spaces and profiling your monitor. Now we will discuss how to set Photoshop and Lightroom for best color space use.

First, Lightroom. Lightroom actually doesn’t use a colorspace profile for an image until it is exported to a different image editor. So the setting of a profile is actually which profile will be assigned to the image when it is sent to an external editor.

To set this up, we go to Lightroom> Preferences Continue Reading

Color Management- Monitors

Monitors have come a long way from the first monitors I used that would show only text and were one bit. The CRT (think your old television set before they went flat screen) was the way to go until the early 90’s when the TFT LCD screens starting coming out (TFT= Thin Film Transistor, LCD= Liquid Crystal Display). These earlier LCD screens were backlight with a CCFL (Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp) but have been replaced by LED (Light Emitting Diode) backlighting. To add to the confusion, LCDs can vary in the manner of display of their crystals. Continue Reading

Color Management

While judging a photo contest this past weekend and seeing a number of images that were over saturated and sometimes with a weird color shift, the judges (Pat Cory, Harold Stinnett and I) all mused as to the reason. At first we were thinking that some people might just like their images to look “different”. Then it dawned on me that it might not be their fault at all.. Well, not consciously. Color management, I think, was the problem. When I mention the colors and the thoughts on color management, the onlookers in the gallery gave up a collective sigh. Several responded out loud that they kinda remembered something about that, but didn’t have any consistent workflow. This blog is for all those who don’t have a consistent workflow. Continue Reading

How I Shot The Snowshoeing Photography Assignment

I am lucky in that I have had a client for 10 years. In fact I have had many clients just as long, but this one is always a lot of fun because it is always outdoor related subjects.

The client is a tourism alliance and I started by selling them outdoor stock imagery which later evolved into assignments resulting in many of them over the years.

In this recent post here: The Future May Be the Commercial Nature Photographer, I suggested that outdoor and nature photographers may need to expand into commercial type subjects as the markets change. There may be more work and income generating opportunities for those who provide more services from video to assignment photography.  And I bring this up because I got this client from marketing my outdoor stock.

I recently completed a winter activities assignment for them in February and we covered a lot of territory from snowmobiling to inter-tubing, the bar in the warming hut to snowshoeing, and more. I plan a few posts the next few weeks to share some of these images with you. Continue Reading