Waterfall Photo Tips

Tweet I was in the White Mountains last week, and while here is still snow on a lot of the trails, the streams have warmed up, the water is flowing, and waterfalls are at full strength. I put together this video to share the techniques I use when making my waterfall photos. Let me know […]

I was in the White Mountains last week, and while here is still snow on a lot of the trails, the streams have warmed up, the water is flowing, and waterfalls are at full strength. I put together this video to share the techniques I use when making my waterfall photos. Let me know if you find it helpful.

On another note, I’m embarking on ambitious film project next week called The Power of Place. Please take a look at what I have planned, and if you like it, pledge to my Kickstarter campaign by May 16th to help make it possible. Thanks!

-Jerry

6 Responses to “Waterfall Photo Tips”

  1. Jerry,
    Always good to hear your tips, especially in the video format, thanks. When outside I almost always use a polarizer for landscapes and water shots. I recently bought an inexpensive but quite good Polaroid Variable ND Filter primarily for waterfalls. So far I am pleased with the results. I find it more useful on those bright sunny Colorado days we often have and even have tried it in conjunction with my polarizer. Unfortunately, with our drought out west waterfalls are becoming hard to find!
    Keep those tips coming…
    Jim

    • Thanks for the comment, Jim. You have more waterfalls out in the open out your way that can be successfully photographed on sunny days (most of ours in New England are in thick woods.) And yes, having water helps! Hopefully, you’ll get some good rains soon!

      Cheers!
      -Jerry

  2. Jerry,
    Thanks for the tips. I enjoy watching & reading them to get me geeked up for my next outdoor wanderings!

    Best,
    Dan

  3. Hi Jerry,
    I’ve been reading your posts for a while and am happy to have found your blog. It was through Outdoor Photographer, by the way. Thanks a lot for all the tips. I like coming back getting inspiration.

    Since I’m a Swiss female living in Switzerland I can tell that landscape photopraphy here is different to the USA. Our contry is very densly populated, which makes it hard to photograph nature without too much staff like power lines, ugly buildings and such. I have no car and therefore, my trips into the mountains are strenous. They start with long train and bus rides. Then I set out to a 3 to 6 hour hike, since the nice places can only be reached on foot. Why am I writing this? Maybe just to point out, that some places are harder to photograph than others.
    Anyway, lots of thanks and greetings,
    Condi

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