Week 8 – Shoot Sharp.

Tweet In this week’s video I discuss how to create sharp images, whether you are hand holding your camera or using a tripod. This may not be the most exciting topic, but it is pretty darn important if you ever want to display your images as anything but a low-res Facebook photo or a 4″ […]

Use a tripod to eliminate unsharp photos due to camera movement.

In this week’s video I discuss how to create sharp images, whether you are hand holding your camera or using a tripod. This may not be the most exciting topic, but it is pretty darn important if you ever want to display your images as anything but a low-res Facebook photo or a 4″ x 6″ print. In this case I’m not talking about out of focus images, but rather images that are a little blurry because the camera moved during exposure. The video describes the techniques necessary to eliminate or compensate for this camera movement. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques and you believe all of your images are truly sharp, please take a look at a handful of them in Photoshop or Lightroom. Zoom in to 100% in Photoshop, or 1:1 view in Lightroom. If the edges of your subject are nice and crisp, then you’re o.k. If not, take a look at the video to learn how to improve your images’ sharpness.

In the video, I mention some tripod and ball head manufacturers. Here’s that list again, with links to their respective websites:

Gitzo

Kirk Photo

Really Right Stuff

Feisol

I know that after spending $1000+ on camera gear that it is hard to spend several hundred more dollars on a quality tripod and head, but it’s worth it. There’s no sense in spending that money on camera gear to end up with fuzzy photos!

Here’s your assignment for the week:

1) Watch the video to learn what you need to do to shoot sharp photos.

2) Get out and shoot. Use the handheld techniques I describe in the video for action shots with wider focal lengths, and use a tripod for your landscape shots and photos made with longer focal lengths. If you don’t have a tripod, borrow one for a day or two to get the hang of it. Use a cable release or wireless release if you have one – otherwise use your camera’s self-timer to avoid pressing the shutter button yourself. Lastly, use mirror lock-up or live view so that your mirror doesn’t create camera shake. View your images at 100% and marvel at how sharp they are!

3) Post one or more photos to our on-line Flickr Group before Wednesday, April 11th.

On Thursday, April 12th, I’ll select one photo to critique and mail a copy of The AMC Guide to Outdoor Digital Photography to the photographer.

On a side note, my Lightroom in a Day Seminar is only 10 days away. There’s still time to sign up if you’re interested.

Thanks for watching, and have fun!

-Jerry

This post was written by

Jerry MonkmanJerry Monkman – who has written posts on Photo Tips from Jerry Monkman and friends.
Known for his conservation photography work in New England’s wild places, Jerry Monkman has spent the last 15 years artfully documenting the mountains, forests, and coastlines that define the region. Staying true to his mission of “promoting ecological awareness through creative photography,” his images have contributed to raising awareness and funds to protect a diverse collection of wild places, from a small Connecticut trout stream not far from New York City, to New Hampshire’s Great Bay, to Maine’s Katahdin Lake near Baxter State Park. His work has appeared in magazines, books, and calendars around the world, including Outdoor Photographer, National Geographic Adventure, Audubon, and the New York Times. With his wife Marcy, Jerry has co-author several books about the region, and recently released his first book on photography instruction, The AMC Guide to Outdoor Digital Photography. Jerry also leads several photo workshops annually in Vermont, New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Acadia National Park, and the Cape Cod National Seashore. He is currently the president-elect of the North American Nature Photography Association. To see more of Jerry’s work, visit his website: www.ecophotography.com.

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