Week 3: Composition Basics.

Tweet Now that you understand light and exposure (you did watch the tips from week 1 and week 2, right?) it’s time to tackle composition. Composition is the most creative part of photography and involves a myriad of concepts, from perspective and balance, to depth of field and scale. It’s also an aspect of photography […]

Now that you understand light and exposure (you did watch the tips from week 1 and week 2, right?) it’s time to tackle composition. Composition is the most creative part of photography and involves a myriad of concepts, from perspective and balance, to depth of field and scale. It’s also an aspect of photography that requires a lot of non-technical input like imagination and inspiration. That part is hard to teach because it comes from the heart, but there are some technical considerations in regards to composition that I’ll outline in the next few weeks.

This week’s video talks about composition basics and focuses on how to use balance in a photo by invoking the rule-of-thirds. I think the video is pretty straightforward so I won’t get into the details here. Give the video a look and post your questions in the comments section below. FYI, the rest of this week I’ll be attending a board meeting of the North American Nature Photography Association, so I may be a little slower than usual responding to comments, but I promise I’ll get to them A.S.A.P.

Here’s your assignment for the week:

1) Watch the video to learn about balance and the rule of thirds.

2) Get out and shoot, striving to create dynamic photos with an asymmetrical balance. Don’t forget what you learned the last couple of weeks – I expect well-exposed photos that make the best use of the available light!

3) Post your photos to our on-line Flickr Group before Wednesday, March 7th.

On Thursday, March 8th, I’ll select one photo to critique and mail a copy of The AMC Guide to Outdoor Digital Photography to the photographer.

On a side note,  my upcoming Cape Cod photo workshop, is titled “Focus on Composition” so if you want to spend three days getting in depth with this stuff in some beautiful landscapes, check it out.

Thanks for watching, and have fun!

-Jerry

This post was written by

Jerry MonkmanJerry Monkman – who has written posts on Photo Tips from Jerry Monkman and friends.
Known for his conservation photography work in New England’s wild places, Jerry Monkman has spent the last 15 years artfully documenting the mountains, forests, and coastlines that define the region. Staying true to his mission of “promoting ecological awareness through creative photography,” his images have contributed to raising awareness and funds to protect a diverse collection of wild places, from a small Connecticut trout stream not far from New York City, to New Hampshire’s Great Bay, to Maine’s Katahdin Lake near Baxter State Park. His work has appeared in magazines, books, and calendars around the world, including Outdoor Photographer, National Geographic Adventure, Audubon, and the New York Times. With his wife Marcy, Jerry has co-author several books about the region, and recently released his first book on photography instruction, The AMC Guide to Outdoor Digital Photography. Jerry also leads several photo workshops annually in Vermont, New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Acadia National Park, and the Cape Cod National Seashore. He is currently the president-elect of the North American Nature Photography Association. To see more of Jerry’s work, visit his website: www.ecophotography.com.

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2 Responses to “Week 3: Composition Basics.”

  1. Ed Llerandi says:

    I do love and enjoy your videos, I don’t know how I didn’t find you before to be part of this composition workshop. Love Nature photography and want to learn as much as I can. I will be checking your future workshops to participate in one of them. Very interesinting in composition.

    Regards,

    Ed

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